Cover image for
Title:
DK Communication / Lisa A. Ford-Brown, Columbia College.
Author:
Ford-Brown, Lisa A., author.
Published:
Boston : Pearson, [2017]
Description:
xxiii, 501 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Subjects:
Contents:
Understand Communication: Chapter 1: Defining Human Communication -- Chapter 2: Understanding Self And Others -- Part 2: Shape Messages: Chapter 3: Verbal Communication -- Chapter 4: Nonverbal Communication -- Chapter 5: Listening -- Part 3: Contact with Others: Chapter 6: Interpersonal Relationships -- Chapter 7: Conflict -- Chapter 8: Group Communication And Leadership -- Chapter 9: Groups at Work -- Chapter: Developing a Speech Topic -- Chapter 11: Creating a Speech -- Chapter 12: Presenting a Speech -- Chapter 13: Informative Speaking -- Chapter 14: Persuasive Speaking.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN:
9780205956579 (student edition)

0205956572 (student edition)

Available:*

Library
Material Type
Call Number
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Book P91.2.F699
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Summary

Summary

For courses in Introduction to Communication

Bring communication concepts to life through visuals that allow students to better make connections at a glance
DK Communication brings communication concepts and theory to life through visual examples and graphics that allow students to better make connections at a glance. Author Lisa Ford-Brown combines straightforward descriptions, student-friendly examples, and practical information with the foundational content that students need -- all presented within a compelling Dorling Kindersley design that facilitates an intuitive learning experience. Making the study of communication as dynamic, interactive, and engaging as communication itself, DK Communication equips students with the tools and confidence to be effective communicators in the classroom and beyond.

Also available with MyCommunicationLab®
MyCommunicationLab for the Introduction to Communication course extends learning online to engage students and improve results. Media resources with assignments bring concepts to life, and offer students opportunities to practice applying what they've learned. Please note: this version of MyCommunicationLab does not include an eText.

DK Communication is also available via REVEL (tm), an interactive learning environment that enables students to read, practice, and study in one continuous experience.

Note: You are purchasing a standalone product; MyLab(tm) & Mastering(tm) does not come packaged with this content. Students, if interested in purchasing this title with MyLab & Mastering, ask your instructor for the correct package ISBN and Course ID. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information.

If you would like to purchase both the physical text and MyLab & Mastering, search for:
0134319958 / 9780134319957 DK Communication plus MyCommunicationLab® for Introduction to Communication - Access Card Package, 1/e
Package consists of:
0205956572 / 9780205956579 DK Communication, 1/e 0133882942 / 9780133882940 MyCommunicationLab for Introduction to Communication Access Card


Author Notes

Lisa A. Ford-Brown is a writer and educator dedicated to the field of human communication. Her books include the DK Guide to Public Speaking and the DK Speaker . She earned her B.S. and M.A. from Indiana State University in Speech Communication with minors in English, the Visual Arts, and Women Studies. She holds a PhD in Speech Communication from Southern Illinois University--Carbondale. She currently teaches at Columbia College. From 2003-2005, Dr. Ford-Brown chaired the Columbia College Humanities Department and served as a member of their Board of Trustees from 2008-2010. Prior to her current position, she taught at Indiana State University and the University of Dubuque. She has received several performance and teaching awards. Most notably, she was named advisor of the year at Columbia College and Faculty of the year at Columbia College and the University of Dubuque. She is a long-standing member of the National Communication Association, Central States Speech Association, and the National Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi. Dr. Ford-Brown and her partner, Bruce, live on a small 20-acre farm with their two golden retrievers (Zelda and Pucc) and two cats (Sadie and Falstaff). They enjoy traveling, camping, fishing, gardening, woodworking, pottery making, and watching the grass grow.


Table of Contents

Part 1 Understanding Communication
Chapter 1 Defining Human
1.1 Why we Communicatep. 4
Practical needsp. 4
Professional needsp. 5
Public needsp. 5
Personal needsp. 6
1.2 Human communicationp. 8
1.3 How we visualize the communication processp. 10
As a linear processp. 10
As an interactional processp. 12
As a transactional processp. 14
1.4 Types of communicationp. 16
1.5 Being a successful communicatorp. 18
Be attentive to sense of self and othersp. 18
Use and interpret verbal and nonverbal messagesp. 18
Listen effectivelyp. 19
Manage your apprehensionp. 19
Practicep. 20
Seethe big picturep. 21
1.6 Being an ethical communicatorp. 22
Be self-monitoringp. 24
Be knowledgeablep. 24
Be truthfulp. 24
Be caringp. 24
Be responsible across all situations and channelsp. 25
Recognize and embrace diversityp. 25
1.7 Valuing diversityp. 26
Recognize the value of differencep. 27
Recognize cultural differencesp. 28
Recognize co-cultural differencesp. 30
Chapter 1 Reviewp. 32
Chapter 2 Understanding Self and Others
2.1 Perceptionp. 38
2.2 The process of perceptionp. 40
Selectingp. 40
Organizingp. 41
Interpretingp. 41
2.3 Factors that influence perceptionp. 42
Physical factorsp. 43
Emotional factorsp. 43
Environmental factorsp. 43
Intellectual factorsp. 43
Experiential factorsp. 43
Cultural factorsp. 44
Mediated factorsp. 44
2.4 Who you arep. 45
Self-awarenessp. 46
Self-conceptp. 47
Self-esteemp. 47
2.5 How you create a perception of selfp. 48
Use reflected appraisalp. 48
Understand social comparisonp. 49
Cultivate and protect who you really arep. 49
2.6 How you manage the "self" you present to othersp. 50
2.7 Some barriers to perceiving others effectivelyp. 54
Negative biasp. 54
First and last impressions (primacy versus recency)p. 55
Stereotypingp. 56
Attributionp. 56
Self-fulfilling prophecyp. 57
Consistencyp. 57
2.8 Developing better perception skillsp. 58
Engage in perception checkingp. 58
Be willing to change your first impressionsp. 60
Beware of selective attentionp. 60
Seek feedback from others about your perception skillsp. 60
Develop identificationp. 60
Chapter 2 Reviewp. 62
Part 2 Shape Messages
Chapter 3 Verbal Communication
3.1 The characteristics of Languagep. 68
Language is symbolicp. 68
Language is meaningless without peoplep. 69
Language meaning is complexp. 70
Language is governed by rulesp. 72
3.2 How language is powerfulp. 74
It namesp. 74
It persuadesp. 74
It unitesp. 74
It dividesp. 75
It empowersp. 75
It is bound to culturep. 75
3.3 Some cultural variations in verbal communication stylesp. 76
Direct versus indirect stylep. 77
Elaborate versus understated stylep. 77
Honorific versus personal stylep. 78
Instrumental versus affective stylep. 78
Silence usagep. 79
3.4 How gender influences verbal communication stylesp. 80
It doesn't significantlyp. 80
It doesn't subtle waysp. 81
3.5 Using language effectivelyp. 82
Be authenticp. 83
Be encouragingp. 83
Be appropriatep. 84
Be clearp. 85
Chapter 3 Reviewp. 86
Chapter 4 Nonverbal Communication
4.1 Traits of nonverbal communicationp. 92
Nonlinguisticp. 92
Arbitrary, ambiguous, and abstractp. 93
Multichanneledp. 93
Innate and learnedp. 93
Contextualp. 94
Culturally boundp. 94
Relationalp. 95
Continuousp. 95
Emotionally expressivep. 96
Powerfulp. 97
4.2 Functions of nonverbal communicationp. 98
4.3 Channels for conveying nonverbal messagesp. 100
Bodyp. 101
Touchp. 104
Facep. 106
Appearancep. 108
Vocal cuesp. 110
Smell and tastep. 114
Timep. 115
Environmentp. 116
4.4 Some cultural variations in nonverbal communicationp. 118
4.5 How gender influences nonverbal messagesp. 120
4.6 Improving your nonverbal communicationp. 122
Develop your interpreting skills (decoding)p. 122
Cultivate your user skills (encoding)p. 123
Chapter 4 Reviewp. 124
Chapter 5 Listening
5.1 Listeningp. 129
More than hearingp. 130
A major portion of your communicative lifep. 131
A processp. 132
5.2 Why listening is importantp. 134
Your knowledge increasesp. 134
You fulfill you' communicative responsibilityp. 135
You build better relationshipsp. 135
You improve professionallyp. 136
You experience enjoymentp. 136
5.3 Types of listeningp. 138
Appreciative listeningp. 138
Empathic listeningp. 138
Informative listeningp. 139
Critics, listeningp. 139
5.4 What prevents effective listeningp. 140
Internal noisep. 141
External noisep. 141
Nonproductive listening practicesp. 142
Your "go-to" listening stylep. 143
5.5 How you can listen effectivelyp. 144
Employ messenger strategiesp. 144
Employ listener strategiesp. 145
Chapter 5 Reviewp. 146
Part 3 Connect with Others
Interpersonal Communication
Chapter 6 Interpersonal Relationships
6.1 Interpersonal relationshipsp. 152
Family relationshipsp. 153
Romantic relationshipsp. 154
Friend relationshipsp. 155
Work relationshipsp. 155
Online relationshipsp. 155
6.2 What encourages interpersonal relationshipsp. 156
Belongingnessp. 157
Rewardp. 157
Attractionp. 158
6.3 How relationships developp. 160
6.4 How self-disclosure influences relationship developmentp. 162
Increases depth and breadth of intimacyp. 163
Helps with self-awareness and impression managementp. 164
Reduces uncertaintyp. 166
6.5 How Culture shapes relationshipsp. 168
Requires diplomacyp. 169
Prescribes relationship rulesp. 169
Influences behavior due to varying cultural dimensionsp. 170
6.6 How gender impacts relationshipsp. 172
6.7 Improving your relationships
Be sensitive to dialectical tensionsp. 174
Employ maintenance behaviorsp. 176
Remember your ethics play by the rules when appropriatep. 178
Chapter 6 Reviewp. 180
Chapter 7 Conflict
7.1 Interpersonal conflictp. 186
7.2 Common conflict typesp. 188
Affective conflictp. 188
Substantial conflictp. 189
Procedural conflictp. 189
7.3 Some negative conflict behaviorsp. 190
Criticismp. 190
Contemptp. 191
Defensivenessp. 191
Stonewallingp. 191
7.4 How you can manage conflictp. 192
By collaboratingp. 192
By accommodatingp. 193
By compromisingp. 193
By competingp. 194
By avoidingp. 194
7.5 How culture can Influence conflictp. 196
7.6 How gender can influence conflictp. 198
It influences behavior in general conflictsp. 198
It influences behavior in romantic conflictsp. 199
7.7 Improving your conflict negotiation skillsp. 200
Embrace the inevitability of conflictp. 200
Avoid detrimental behaviorsp. 201
Utilize constructive behaviorsp. 201
Commit to a resolution methodp. 202
Chapter 7 Reviewp. 204
Small Group Communication
Chapter 8 Group Communication and Leadership
8.1 What makes a small groupp. 210
Sizep. 210
Interdependent membersp. 211
Rules and normsp. 212
A common goal over timep. 213
Links to personal, public, or professional needsp. 214
8.2 How groups developp. 216
8.3 How group members interactp. 218
Wheel networksp. 219
Chain networksp. 219
All-channel networksp. 219
8.4 Roles you can play in a small groupp. 220
Leaderp. 220
Memberp. 224
8.5 How culture can influence small groupsp. 226
Influences group formation and leadershipp. 226
Affects group perspectives and interactionsp. 227
8.6 How gender can influence small groupsp. 228
8.7 Improving your small group skillsp. 230
Set group guidelinesp. 230
Employ the 5-C principlesp. 231
Diminish unproductive behaviorsp. 231
Chapter 8 Reviewp. 232
Chapter 9 Groups at Work
9.1 The DECIDE model for decision making and problem solvingp. 238
9.2 How groups generate ideas, alternatives, or solutionsp. 240
Brainstorrningp. 240
Nominal Group Techniquep. 241
Brainwritingp. 241
9.3 How groups ultimately select decisions or solutionsp. 242
Consensusp. 242
Majority rulep. 243
Minority rulep. 244
Expert opinionp. 244
Authority rulep. 244
9.4 How culture and gender can influence decision making and problem solvingp. 246
Culture's potential impactp. 247
Gender's potential impactp. 250
9.5 Effectively communicating in meetingsp. 252
As a participantp. 252
As a leaderp. 253
In visual settingsp. 254
In group presentationsp. 256
Chapter 9 Reviewp. 258
Public Communication
Chapter 10 Developing a Speech Topic
10.1 Being a successful public speakerp. 264
Be audience centeredp. 264
Be ethicalp. 265
Be confidentp. 265
10.2 The creative process for public speakingp. 266
10.3 What you need to know about your audiencep. 268
Attitudesp. 268
Beliefsp. 269
Valuesp. 269
Personal traitsp. 270
Psychological traitsp. 272
Social traitsp. 273
10.4 What you need to know about the speaking situationp. 274
Placep. 274
Audience sizep. 274
Timep. 275
Occasionp. 275
10.5 Analyzing the audience and situationp. 276
10.6 Creating a central ideap. 278
Identify your general purposep. 278
Create a topic idea bankp. 279
Select your topicp. 281
Identify the specific purposep. 282
Formulate the central ideap. 284
Evaluate your central ideap. 286
Chapter 10 Reviewp. 288
Chapter 11 Creating a Speech
11.1 Locating support materialsp. 294
Commercial websitesp. 295
Nonprofit organization websitesp. 295
Blogsp. 296
Personal websitesp. 296
Databasesp. 297
Booksp. 298
Newspapersp. 298
Magazinesp. 299
Journalsp. 299
Government resourcesp. 300
Reference worksp. 300
Interviewsp. 301
Surveysp. 301
11.2 Types of support materialsp. 302
Factsp. 302
Definitionsp. 302
Testimonyp. 303
Examplesp. 303
Statisticsp. 304
Quotations and paraphrasingp. 305
Comparison, contrast, or analogyp. 305
11.3 What you should consider when choosing support materialsp. 306
11.4 Characteristics of an effective outlinep. 308
Includes standard parts of an outlinep. 308
Adheres to outlining rulesp. 309
11.5 Organizational strategiesp. 316
Topicalp. 316
Chronologicalp. 317
Spatialp. 317
Causalp. 318
Comparativep. 318
Problem-solutionp. 319
Monroe's motivated sequencep. 319
11.6 How to begin and end a speechp. 320
The introductionp. 321
The conclusionp. 321
11.7 Types of outlinesp. 322
Working outlinesp. 322
Preparation outlinesp. 322
Delivery outlinesp. 326
Chapter 11 Reviewp. 328
Chapter 12 Presenting a Speech
12.1 Using language effectively in a Speechp. 334
Be correctp. 335
Be specificp. 336
Be conversationalp. 337
Be distinctivep. 338
12.2 Methods of deliveryp. 340
Extemporaneous speakingp. 340
Manuscript speakingp. 341
Memorized speakingp. 341
Impromptu speakingp. 341
12.3 Preparing for an extemporaneous speechp. 342
Read aloud the preparation outlinep. 342
Consider your support materialsp. 343
Prepare your delivery outlinep. 343
Prepare your presentation aidsp. 343
Practice multiple timesp. 344
Do a final "dress rehearsal"p. 344
Prepare for questionsp. 345
Prepare for the day of the speechp. 345
12.4 Preparing for a mediated presentationp. 346
Establish the type of presentationp. 346
Address unique factorsp. 348
Practicep. 349
12.5 Types of presentation aidsp. 350
Actual itemsp. 350
Modelsp. 351
Photographsp. 351
Drawingsp. 352
Charts and tablesp. 352
Graphsp. 353
Mediap. 355
12.6 Using a presentation aid successfullyp. 356
Determine what to usep. 356
Craft an effective aidp. 358
Chapter 12 Reviewp. 360
Chapter 13 Informative Speaking
13.1 Informative speakingp. 366
13.2 The creative process for informative speakingp. 368
13.3 Developing and researching an informative topicp. 370
Get to know the audience and situationp. 370
Create an informative idea bankp. 371
Select and narrow your informative topicp. 371
Identify your specific purpose Confirm the best type of informative speechp. 372
Identify your central ideap. 373
Create a working outlinep. 374
Conduct your researchp. 375
13.4 Outlining and organizing an informative speechp. 376
Start with basic, effective outliningp. 376
Commit to a strategyp. 378
Construct main pointsp. 379
Organize support materialsp. 379
Compose your introduction and conclusionp. 380
Sample preparation outline for an informative speechp. 382
13.5 Presenting or evaluating an informative speechp. 388
Put your speech on its feetp. 388
Evaluate the speechp. 389
Chapter 13 Reviewp. 390
Chapter 14 Persuasive Speaking
14.1 Persuasive speakingp. 396
Focuses listeners' optionsp. 396
Seeks a responsep. 396
Supports a proposition of fact, value, or policyp. 397
14.2 The creative process for persuasive speakingp. 398
14.3 Appeals you can use persuade top. 400
Traditional appealsp. 400
Modern appealsp. 402
14.4 Parts of an argumentp. 404
Claimp. 404
Evidencep. 404
Warrantsp. 405
14.5 Types of argumentsp. 406
Argument by deductionp. 406
Argument by inductionp. 408
Argument by analogyp. 409
Argument by causep. 409
Argument by authorityp. 409
14.6 Developing and researching a persuasive topicp. 410
Get to know the audience and situationp. 410
Create a persuasive idea bankp. 411
Select and narrow your persuasive topicp. 411
Confirm the best type of persuasive speechp. 412
Identify your specific purposep. 413
Identify your central ideap. 414
Create a working outlinep. 415
Conduct your researchp. 415
14.7 Outlining and organizing a persuasive speechp. 416
Start with basic, effective outliningp. 416
Commit to a strategyp. 418
Construct main pointsp. 419
Organize support materialsp. 419
Compose your introduction and conclusionp. 420
Sample preparation outline for a persuasive speechp. 422
14.8 Presenting or evaluating a persuasive speechp. 430
Put your speech on its feetp. 430
Evaluate the speechp. 431
Chapter 14 Reviewp. 434
Glossaryp. 438
Notesp. 458
Indexp. 480
Creditsp. 496