Cover image for
Title:
The intersectional Internet : race, sex, class and culture online / edited by Safiya Umoja Noble and Brendesha M. Tynes.
Published:
New York : Peter Lang Publishing, Inc., [2016]

©2016
Description:
vi, 278 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Series:
Digital formations ; v.105.
Summary:
From race, sex, class, and culture, the multidisciplinary field of Internet studies needs theoretical and methodological approaches that allow us to question the organization of social relations that are embedded in digital technologies, and that foster a clearer understanding of how power relations are organized through technologies. Representing a scholarly dialogue among established and emerging critical media and information studies scholars, this volume provides a means of foregrounding new questions, methods, and theories which can be applied to digital media, platforms, and infrastructures. These inquiries include, among others, how representation to hardware, software, computer code, and infrastructures might be implicated in global economic, political, and social systems of control. Contributors argue that more research needs to explicitly trace the types of uneven power relations that exist in technological spaces. By looking at both the broader political and economic context and the many digital technology acculturation processes as they are differentiated intersectionally, a clearer picture emerges of how under-acknowledging culturally situated and gendered information technologies are impacting the possibility of participation with (or purposeful abstinence from) the Internet. This book is ideal for undergraduate and graduate courses in Internet studies, library and information studies, communication, sociology, and psychology. It is also ideal for researchers with varying expertise and will help to advance theoretical and methodological approaches to Internet research. -- Publisher description
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Other Authors:
Noble, Safiya Umoja, editor.

Tynes, Brendesha M., editor.
ISBN:
9781433130007 (pbk. : alk. paper)

1433130009 (pbk. : alk. paper)

9781433130014 (hardcover : alk. paper)

1433130017 (hardcover : alk. paper)

9781453917176 (e-book)

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Summary

Summary

From race, sex, class, and culture, the multidisciplinary field of Internet studies needs theoretical and methodological approaches that allow us to question the organization of social relations that are embedded in digital technologies, and that foster a clearer understanding of how power relations are organized through technologies.
Representing a scholarly dialogue among established and emerging critical media and information studies scholars, this volume provides a means of foregrounding new questions, methods, and theories which can be applied to digital media, platforms, and infrastructures. These inquiries include, among others, how representation to hardware, software, computer code, and infrastructures might be implicated in global economic, political, and social systems of control.
Contributors argue that more research needs to explicitly trace the types of uneven power relations that exist in technological spaces. By looking at both the broader political and economic context and the many digital technology acculturation processes as they are differentiated intersectionally, a clearer picture emerges of how under-acknowledging culturally situated and gendered information technologies are impacting the possibility of participation with (or purposeful abstinence from) the Internet.
This book is ideal for undergraduate and graduate courses in Internet studies, library and information studies, communication, sociology, and psychology. It is also ideal for researchers with varying expertise and will help to advance theoretical and methodological approaches to Internet research.


Author Notes

Safiya Umoja Noble (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) is an assistant professor in the Department of Information Studies in the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at UCLA. She is co-editor of Emotions, Technology, and Design (2016) and an editorial board member of the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies.
Brendesha M. Tynes (Ph.D., UCLA) is Associate Professor of Education and Psychology at the University of Southern California. She is the recipient of the American Educational Research Association Early Career Award and the Spencer Foundation Midcareer Award.


Table of Contents

Safiya Umoja Noble and Brendesha M. TynesBrendesha M. Tynes and Joshua Schuschke and Safiya Umoja NobleJessie DanielsMyra WashingtonCatherine Knight SteeleAymar Jean ChristianJenny Ungbha KornDavid J. LeonardSarah T. RobertsMolly NiesenErgin BulutMelissa Villa-NicholasMiriam E. SweeneyRobert MejiaTiera Chante Tanksley
Introductionp. 1
Part 1 Cultural Values in the Machine
Chapter 1 Digital Intersectionality Theory and the #Blacklivesmatter Movementp. 21
Chapter 2 The Trouble With White Feminism: Whiteness, Digital Feminism, and the Intersectional Internetp. 41
Chapter 3 Asian/American Masculinity: The Politics of Virility, Virality, and Visibilityp. 61
Chapter 4 Signifyin', Bitching, and Blogging: Black Women and Resistance Discourse Onlinep. 73
Chapter 5 Video Stars: Marketing Queer Performance in Networked Televisionp. 95
Chapter 6 Black Women Exercisers, Asian Women Artists, White Women Daters, and Latina Lesbians: Cultural Constructions of Race and Gender Within Intersectionality-Based Facebook Groupsp. 115
Chapter 7 Grand Theft Auto V: Post-Racial Fantasies and Ferguson Realitiesp. 129
Part 2 Cultural Values as the Machine
Chapter 8 Commercial Content Moderation: Digital Laborers'Dirty Workp. 147
Chapter 9 Love, Inc.: Toward Structural Intersectional Analysis of Online Dating Sites and Applicationsp. 161
Chapter 10 The Nation-State in Intersectional Internet: Turkey's Encounters With Facebook and Twitterp. 179
Chapter 11 The Invisible Information Worker: Latinas in Telecommunicationsp. 195
Chapter 12 The Intersectional Interfacep. 215
Chapter 13 The Epidemiology of Digital Infrastructurep. 229
Chapter 14 Education, Representation, and Resistance: Black Girls in Popular Instagram Memesp. 243
Contributorsp. 261
Indexp. 269